Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Report: Global Trends in Fisheries Governance: Improving sustainability. Conference organized by the Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management. Rosenbad Conference Centre, Stockholm 29-30 January 2014
Responsible organisation
2014 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The new Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) of the European Union was adopted on 11 December 2013. Not only does it reform the fisheries policy governing the European waters, but for the first time in its thirty-year history, international aspects of fisheries management are included in the Basic Regulation. Until now these aspects have been covered by non-legally binding Council Conclusions.

The conference Global Trends in Fisheries Governance – Improving Sustainability was organized by the Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, in Rosenbad Conference Centre, Stockholm 29-30 January 2014, with the aim of analysing the external dimension of the new CFP, and increasing the understanding and interpretation of the policy and its implementation at all different management levels for improved sustainability.

The Conference explored possible tools, options, responsibilities and challenges for the implementation of the external dimension of the new CFP. It was funded by the Swedish Ministry of Rural Affairs. It focused on the European Union’s bilateral relations with third countries, and the EU as a member of regional fisheries bodies and other relevant international organizations in light of the reformed CFP.

The CFP exists in a context of other policies, both within the EU and at a global level. The conference examined various connections with the fisheries policy and recent developments in the UN Convention of the Law of the sea, UNCLOS, the UN Convention of Biodiversity, CBD, and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations.

The conference highlighted the challenges of protecting biodiversity, both within Exclusive Economic Zones and in international waters. Necessary measures that must be taken to safeguard the potential of fish stocks to contribute to long-term food security were also discussed.

The sessions followed a keynote adress by Mr Eskil Erlandsson, the Swedish Minister of Rural Affairs. Each session ended with a panel discussion. The sessions adressed the following issues:

  • What political and management changes can the new External Dimension lead to and what can EU decision makers and managers do to steer developments to meet the objectives?
  • Which global opportunities and challenges do fisheries and aquaculture face? These include the future role of the fisheries sector for food security and economic development in a growing blue economy.
  • Global developments within regional fisheries management organizations, UNCLOS developments, how biodiversity in the protection of national and international waters relates to fisheries management an how fisheries can contribute to global food security.

There were 20 presentations and 110 participants from all continents. The conference was fascilitated by Anna Jöborn, Director, the Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, and Axel Wenblad, former Director-General of the Swedish Board of Fisheries. Mr Björn Risinger, Director General, the Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, gave the concluding remarks and closed the conference.

A set of major issues and themes emerged from the presentations and discussions. The European Union is a major producer of fish and fish products, and it is also the largest importer of fish in the world. This gives reinforced impetus to the notion that all EU Member States, and not only the producing Member States, must pay more attention to the long-term sustainability of fish stocks in and beyond EU waters. The demand for fish will continue to rise in the Union, although the supply may not increase simultaneously. This will raise questions about the European Union’s fair share of the world market of fish and fish products. The question about the substitution of feed fish for consumption was also raised.

The need for globally responsible governance and cooperation becomes imperative in light of the increasing competition between major producers and major markets in the world.

The conference stressed the need for transparency in the allocation of resources and in the governance of the sector. The need for transparency was also raised in connection with sharing information about subsidies. In order to improve commitment and adherence to global, regional or local government measures, meaningful consultations with all relevant stakeholders is important. The potential of Advisory Councils (AC) to foster stakeholder participation was discussed.

The legal and biological defintions of the concept of surplus, which is the basic issue for agreements pertaining to fishin rights according to UNCLOS and now embedded in the CFP, are essential for good governance. The defintion of surplus and, in relation to that, how to calculate and assess Maximum Sustainable Yield, will become increasingly important. The conference discussed the different roles of politicians, managers and scientists in this process.

Consumers are becoming more vocal about their demands, which can alter the behaviour of producers of goods and services. Consumers, who demand supplies of fish and fish products from sustainable fish stocks, may have a positive influence on fisheries management and may improve sustainabilty in the long run.

The conference highlighted the importance of continuing the battle against illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fisheries. That battle has not been won as yet, and all potential means to attain this goal are required to reduce and prevent IUU fisheries. The European Commition plays a vital role in attaining this goal on a global level.

The conference discussed the issue of sectoral integration, for example for the implementation of UNCLOS and the Biodiversity Convention, but no consensus was reached. While some participants emphasized the need for increased sectoral integration, others questioned if there are any successful examples of such integration.

Regional fisheries management organizations play a key role for the management of resources in the high seas. The performance of these organizations has, however, varied, and some have been largely ineffective in promoting sustainable fisheries. The conference explored the performance of RFMOs and ways to improve their efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Havs- och vattenmyndigheten, 2014. , p. 59
Series
Havs- och vattenmyndighetens rapport ; 2014:9
Keywords [en]
fish, aquaculture, global sustainability, Common Fisheries Policy, EU, bilateral relations
National Category
Fish and Aquacultural Science
Research subject
Finance, National; Coast and Sea, Phytobentic communities; Coast and Sea, Coastal fish stocks; Environmental Objectives, A Rich Diversity of Plant and Animal Life
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:havochvatten:diva-240ISBN: 978-91-87025-54-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:havochvatten-240DiVA, id: diva2:1379052
Note

Rapporten saknas i digitalt fulltextformat men finns i tryckt format på Havs- och vattenmyndighetens bibliotek, bibliotek@havochvatten.se.

Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-16

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Fish and Aquacultural Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf